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Calendar and Menus

Cards and domino games are every Friday evening with light refreshments at 6 p.m. and games starting by 6:45. Winner of the door prize Friday evening was Leah (Hillyard) Johnson.

Menus Nov. 3-7

Monday: ribiq, broccoli, corn, pudding; Tuesday: smothered chicken, potatoes, green beans, cook’s choice dessert; Wednesday: goulash, lettuce salad, hot bread, juice, cake; Thursday: ham and beans, tomatoes, coleslaw, cornbread, fruit; Friday: roast beef, potatoes and gravy, green beans, apple salad, pumpkin bars.

Pattonsburg News

by Lavena Lowrey

Deloris Kane, Waverly, Kan., came last Tuesday to visit Paul and Doris Cameron, Dom Finazzo from Blue Springs drove her there. Dom was married to the late Joann Cameron, niece of Paul and Deloris.

Virgil and Fran Albert and Darlis Wallace went to Lawson a weekend or so ago and met with Danny and Marsha Albert for a cook-out at the park.

Saturday visitors of Letha Shipers were Mr. and Mrs. Mike Shipers, Holt. They were celebrating Mike’s 63rd birthday. Alice Bell also visited this week.

Leanna Thompson visited Woodrow and Maxine Morris Saturday afternoon. Forrest and Jeanna Morris also visited this week.

Nancy West went with Patricia Darby and son Andy, Bethany, to Phoenix, Ariz., to attend a college basketball clinic for four days. They returned home Sunday night..

Friday John and Mary Mikes came from Woodbury, Minn. They are visiting relatives and friends, including Nancy West, Ed and Jane Howard.

Julia Cornett and Betty Daniels visited Mr. and Mrs. Donald Breeze Sunday afternoon at Hamilton.

MoDOT to sell properties during 4-day blitz

The Missouri Department of Transportation will quickly sell 23 highly marketable properties. MoDOT’s Northwest District will be taking part in the event by offering two of those properties.

The Realty to Roads Blitz is an all-out attempt to sell multiple properties across the state in a short period of time. The properties will sell either at auction or by sealed bid from Nov. 16-20. Details about the program can be found at www.modot.org/realtyforsale.

During the blitz the Northwest District will be selling a property in Clinton County and a property in Daviess County. Both will be sold by sealed bid. The bids for these two properties will be opened at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 18 at the District Office in St. Joseph. Information about each property is as follows: Daviess County: The former Winston commuter lot is located at the S.E. Quadrant of Interstate 35 and U.S. 69 Hwy., between the service road and the interstate. The site is 2.07 acres in size.

Clinton County: The Lathrop commuter lot is located at the S.E. Quadrant of Interstate 35 and MO 116, east of the service road. The site is 6.9 acres in size.

"Our goal is to sell a fairly large number of properties in a concentrated amount of time," said Gregory Wood, Realty to Roads Project Director in MoDOT’s Right of Way Division. "We want to draw attention to the fact we have property for sale and get land we’re no longer using in the hands of owners who can put it to good use. A benefit to everyone is the fact that the money from the sales goes to fund needed road and bridge project."

For more information about this or other projects being handled by MoDOT, please call our toll-free customer service hotline at: 1-888-ASK-MoDOT (1-888-275-6636).

Jamesport blood drive at Mennonite school

Community Blood Center, the provider of blood services to local hospitals, will be conducting a blood drive from 2-7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 3, in Jamesport at the Mennonite School gym, 704 S. Myrtle, to help the local hospital patients in our area that depend on life saving blood donations.

To make an appointment online go to www.esavealifenow.org and use sponsor code jamesportarea. You may also contact Ivan Ray Miller at 660-684-6563. Just one donation can help as many as two local hospital patients.

Jail dips into CD, hoping for inmate numbers to come back up

The Daviess/DeKalb Regional Jail Board withdrew $200,000 in August from a CD at BTC Bank, which was deposited into the operating account to pay bills.

The jail’s numbers have been down since the loss of Polk County inmates, said Daviess County Presiding Commissioner Lance Critten. While income is down, expenses also ought to be down, he added. Some expenses have not changed, however, such as payroll, since the jail has not opted to lay off any workers.

"We’re hoping to find other prisoners to house," said Mr. Critten. "We’re confident we’ll get the numbers back up."

He said it was unlikely the jail would find as big a supplier of inmates as Polk County. Instead they are hoping to combine several smaller jails.

Sheriff Ben Becerra told the board during their Sept. 29 meeting that he had talked to Wyandotte County about housing inmates.

Daviess County Commissioners Danny Heldenbrand and David Cox attended the meeting and discussed that they would be willing to go talk to any other county commissioners to help the jail out in getting contracts to house inmates.

In other business at the September meeting, the board noted that the guard shack is ready for operation and is expected to be opened in the middle of October. Policy and procedure has been written.

The board discussed talking with Health Professionals about getting flu shots.

SRI Roofing is coming in September to fix the roof at no cost.

The financial report, aging report and budget message were read by Mary Morrow and approved by the board.

Sales tax income of $104,138.13 was reported for the month of September. Year to date on sales tax income is $495,700.39. Sales tax checking account has $180,661.93 in the account with a six month CD for $800,000 and a six month CD for $475,000 at BTC Bank. Total is $1,455,661.93.

Commissary grossed $11,670.56.

Swanson income was $117.98.

The jail’s operating account balance is $138,615.76 with a six month CD of $300,000 at BTC Bank. Total is $438,615.76.

Since Jan. 1, Daviess County has saved $302,040.00 on inmate housing and DeKalb County has saved $392,880.00.

The aging report as of September showed an outstanding balance of $37,200.

Next meeting is set for Oct. 30, at 10 a.m.

The board entered into to closed session to talk with Doug Harpool of Baird, Lightner, Millsap & Harpool, P.C. pursuant to 610.021RSMo.

Present at the Sept. 29 meeting were Daviess County Sheriff Ben Becerra; Daviess County Presiding Commissioner Lance Critten; DeKalb County Presiding Commissioner David Lippold; Jail Administrator Larry Hadley; Board Secretary Mary Morrow; Daviess County Commissioner Danny Heldenbrand; Daviess County Commissioner David Cox.

The Daviess/DeKalb County Regional Jail met on Aug. 29 at Pattonsburg.

The financial report, aging report and budget message were read by David Tolen and approved by the board.

Sales tax income of $55,650.93 was reported for the month of August. Year to date on sales tax income is $391,562.26. Sales tax checking account has $76,393.92 in the account with a six month CD for $800,000 and a six month CD for $475,000 at BTC Bank. Total is $1,742,956.18.

The commissary grossed $10,392.15.

Swanson income was $142.03.

The jail’s operating account balance is $4,257.22 with a six month CD of $200,000 at BTC Bank and a six month CD of $300,000 at BTC Bank. Total is $504,257.22.

Since Jan. 1, Daviess County has saved $271,140 on inmate housing and DeKalb County has saved $342,900.

Aging report as of August showed an outstanding balance of $38,422.45.

The $800,000 CD with BTC Bank was renewed.

The board carried a motion to withdraw $200,000 from the operating CD.

The board entered into closed session to discuss personnel issues.

Present at the Aug. 29 meeting were Daviess County Sheriff Ben Becerra; Daviess County Presiding Commissioner Lance Critten; DeKalb County Sheriff Wes Raines; DeKalb County Presiding Commissioner David Lippold; Jail Administrator Larry Hadley; and Board Secretary Mary Morrow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Hills Martial Arts celebrates grand opening

On Sept. 26, a grand opening celebration and ribbon cutting ceremony was held at the new location of Green Hills Martial Arts. Mayor Ballew, center, was in attendance to assist school owners Tim and Linda Dunaway with the ribbon cutting, and to extend an official welcome into the community.

Head Start goal to improve oral health

The Green Hills Head Start Program, sponsored by North Central Missouri College of Trenton, provides service to families and children in the nine-county Green Hills Area. Vicky Hiley is the Gallatin Head Start Teacher. She may be contacted at 660-663-8976.

One of the goals of Head Start is to improve the oral health of children and their families. The major oral disease of preschool children is dental cavities. Dental cavities can begin to develop soon after a primary (baby) tooth erupts into the mouth which can be as early as six to eight months of age. The disease rate is highest during childhood and adolescence.

Based on research, fluoride can greatly reduce the incidence of dental cavities. The Green Hills Head Start Program arranges for dental examinations for the Head Start target population and sometimes financially assists families of children who need additional services. Children brush teeth daily in all Head Start centers, practicing proper tooth brushing techniques. Enrolled children are also eligible to participate in a fluoride varnish program which is a result of a partnership between Green Hills Head Start and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

Corn hybrid dry-down

by Wayne Flanary, regional agronomist

The dry-down rate for corn varies with hybrids. Most hybrids have an assigned maturity rating which is the basis of moisture differences among hybrids at harvest. If hybrids differ by one day on relative maturity, this generally translates to about one half a percentage point of moisture. Keep in mind that companies differ on how they rate maturities.

Individual hybrids have differing characteristics that contribute to different dry-down rates. For example, the pericarp which is the outside of the kernel affects the drying rate. The thinner the kernel, the faster the corn will dry. However, it is still the fall weather that most influences the dry-down rates.

Also, there are a number of factors that are related to the leaf husk. For example, the more husk leaves, the slower the corn will dry. The thicker the husk leaf, the slower the corn will dry. Also, early death of the leaf husk and coverage of the ear by the husk will impact speed of drying.

Finally, ear declination affects moisture loss. Ears that drop from the upright position after maturity to a downward position will shed rainfall. Upright ears can capture rainfall.

Many growers have called the Extension office to discuss the slow drying and ways to dry grain for safe storage.

For more information, contact Wayne Flanary at 660-446-3724 or Heather Benedict at 660-425-6434, Regional Agronomists, University of Missouri Extension.

Tobacco in Northwest Missouri

by Wilbur Bush

In the Depression years, during the 1920s and 1930s, tobacco was on the verge of becoming a stable crop in northwest Missouri. Local farmers were planting the crop in hopes it would be a permanent thing. By 1941, buyers from almost every state in the union were bidding on tobacco and it was netting the farmers from $240 to $300 per acre.

Tobacco was imported to northwest Missouri. A 74-year-old Pattonsburg lady had 2,970 tobacco sacks and made them into nine quilt tops. Neither she nor her husband smoked. Most of the sacks had been brought to her by her two grandsons who were members of the CCC camps, while others had been given to her by her neighbors. She also made other things out of them which she said, if piled together, would fill a boxcar.

In 1943, another tobacco project was established at Gallatin. The American Legion Post placed jars for money donations around the town to raise money for cigarettes for the servicemen. The words “You did it before, you can do it again” were to be placed on each of the first 1,000 packages of cigarettes purchased with the $50 which was collected. In this case, the tobacco was purchased from the Reynolds Tobacco Company, makers of Camel cigarettes, for five cents per package.

In 1931, a northwest Missouri farmer had a 3-acre plot planted in tobacco. The crop was cut around Sept. 10 and stored in his barn where it was kept until the middle of November. Then it was graded and prepared for the Weston market. When the crop was still in the field, an expert tobacco inspector had estimated the yield to be 1,700 pounds. It was thought the selling price would be 15 cents per pound.